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PHYSL210A Human Physiology Course Page

Description: Introductory course in human physiology. Students will study the function and regulation of the human body and the complexities and interactions of cells, tissues, major organs and systems. This course is offered as a classroom-based course or in an online format. Students may not transfer from one mode of instruction to the other. Prerequisites: BIOL 107; plus 6 credits in University level Chemistry. Credit may be obtained in only one of PHYSL 210 or 212 and 214. See PHYSL 212 and 214.

PHYSL210B Human Physiology Course Page

Description: Introductory course in human physiology. Students will study the function and regulation of the human body and the complexities and interactions of cells, tissues, major organs and systems. This course is offered as a classroom-based course or in an online format. Students may not transfer from one mode of instruction to the other. Prerequisites: BIOL 107; plus 6 credits in University level Chemistry. Credit may be obtained in only one of PHYSL 210 or 212 and 214. See PHYSL 212 and 214.

PHYSL212 Human Physiology I Course Page

Description: An introduction to human physiology. Part 1, covering: membrane transport mechanisms; intracellular and electrical signaling; the physiology of excitable tissues; the physiology of blood; and the cardiovascular system. Required for students in the Physiology Honors program. Recommended for students in other Honors/Specialization programs. Prerequisites: BIOL 107; CHEM 101 and 102. Pre- or corequisites: CHEM 164 or 261, and 263. Credit may be obtained in only one of PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210. Students with credit in PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210 may not obtain credit in ZOOL 241 or 242. Students in some Honors/Specialization programs may require PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210. See your departmental advisor.

PHYSL214 Human Physiology II Course Page

Description: An introduction to human physiology. Part 2, covering: the physiology of the gastrointestinal tract; the respiratory system; the renal system; endocrinology; and the reproductive system. Required for students in the Physiology Honors program. Recommended for students in other Honors/Specialization programs. Prerequisite: PHYSL 212.

PHYSL310 Experimental Techniques in Physiology Course Page

Description: Modern techniques in Physiology (involving cell biology, molecular, histological and live cell imaging, and non-invasive experimentation) will be discussed in theory and demonstrated/utilized in a series of laboratory experiments. Student participation as subjects may be required in some labs. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PHYSL 210 or PHYSL 212 and 214 and consent of Department.

PHYSL372 Systems Neuroscience Course Page

Description: Introduction to the organization and function of vertebrate nervous systems. Major topics will be neural development, control of movement, integration of sensory information, and the neuronal mechanisms underlying memory and learning. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210, or ZOOL 242.

PHYSL400 Reproductive Physiology Course Page

Description: The aim of this course is to describe (i) the causes of infertility, (ii) therapeutic approaches to restore or enhance fertility and (iii) contraceptive approaches to avoid pregnancy. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210 and consent of Department.

PHYSL401 Molecular and Cellular Physiology Course Page

Description: The molecular and cellular aspects of physiological processes. Main areas include the structure and functions of plasma membranes (emphasizing transport processes and their regulation) and the mechanism of action of hormones (hormone-receptor interactions, receptor regulation and interactions of intracellular mediators). The physiological significance of these processes will be stressed throughout. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210 and consent of Department.

PHYSL402 Homeostatic Physiology Course Page

Description: Advanced principles of regulatory mechanisms in human and mammalian physiology, with in depth analysis of interrelationships between different organ systems in the maintenance of homeostasis. Clinical and physiologic perspectives are highlighted in the demonstration of how organ systems interact in health and the disruption in homeostasis which occurs in disease. Contemporary topics in energy and cardiovascular homeostasis such as the physiological adaptations to pregnancy, exercise, obesity and diabetes will be explored using an integrative, systems physiology approach. Suitable as preparation for careers in medicine, biomedical research and health-related fields. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214 (or 210), 404 and consent of Department.

PHYSL403 Neuroendoimmunomodulation Course Page

Description: The physiological and pathophysiological interrelationships between the nervous, endocrine and immune systems. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210 and consent of Department.

PHYSL404 Cardiovascular Physiology Course Page

Description: General concepts in human cardiovascular physiology: properties of the myocardium, heart function, vascular biology, hemodynamics and control of cardiovascular system. Discussion of cardiovascular pathologies and relevant clinical situations. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210 and consent of Department.

PHYSL405 Sensory Physiology Course Page

Description: The sensory systems in human physiology. The topics covered will be vision, hearing, vestibular mechanisms, taste, smell and touch, including receptor mechanisms and central organization. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210 and consent of Department.

PHYSL407 Molecular and Cellular Physiology Course Page

Description: The molecular and cellular aspects of physiological processes. Main areas include the structure and functions of plasma membranes (emphasizing transport processes, their regulation and methods of study) and the mechanism of action of hormones (hormonereceptor interactions, receptor regulation and interactions of intracellular mediators). The physiological significance of these processes will be stressed throughout. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210 and consent of Department.

PHYSL409 Homeostatic Physiology Course Page

Description: Advanced principles of regulatory mechanisms in human and mammalian physiology, with in depth analysis of interrelationships between different organ systems in the maintenance of homeostasis. Clinical and physiologic perspectives are highlighted in the demonstration of how organ systems interact in health and the disruption in homeostasis which occurs in disease. Contemporary topics in energy and cardiovascular homeostasis such as the physiological adaptations to pregnancy, exercise, obesity and diabetes will be explored using an integrative, systems physiology approach. Suitable as preparation for careers in medicine, biomedical research and health-related fields. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214 (or 210), 404 and consent of Department.

PHYSL444 Current Topics in Neuroscience Course Page

Description: A lecture course emphasizing contemporary aspects of developmental, cellular, systems and cognitive neurophysiology. Topics will include experience-dependent processes in the development of the nervous system, the molecular and cellular mechanisms for learning and memory, the electrophysiology of rhythmic activity in identified brain circuits, the microphysiology of transmitter secretion, and the representation and transformation of information in the nervous system. Students will be expected to demonstrate a thorough understanding of selected readings from current and classical literature. Suitable for honors students in Physiology, Pharmacology, Psychology and Neuroscience. Prerequisites: PMCOL 371 or ZOOL 342, and PHYSL 372 and consent of Department.

PHYSL461 Undergraduate Research Project Course Page

Description: Individual study, open to undergraduate students who have identified a supervisor in the Department of Physiology. Co-supervisors from other Departments are permitted. Students will spend one term in the laboratory of a faculty member and carry out a laboratory research project. Registration package and further information are available. Prerequisites: PHYSL 210 or PHYSL 212/214 and consent from the course coordinator.

PHYSL466 Undergraduate Tutorial Course Page

Description: Individual study. Restricted to students in the Physiology Honors Program. Students will select a faculty member who will guide them through a course of reading at an advanced level on a specialized topic. Successful completion of an oral presentation is required at the conclusion of the project. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once.

PHYSL467A Undergraduate Research Project Course Page

Description: Individual study, open to undergraduate students who have identified a supervisor in the department of Physiology. Co-supervision with Professors from other Departments is possible, provided that a supervisor from the department of Physiology is identified. Students will spend two terms in the laboratory of a faculty member and carry out a laboratory research project. Prerequisites: PHYSL 210 or PHYSL 212/214 and consent from the course coordinator.

PHYSL467B Undergraduate Research Project Course Page

Description: Individual study, open to undergraduate students who have identified a supervisor in the department of Physiology. Co-supervision with Professors from other Departments is possible, provided that a supervisor from the department of Physiology is identified. Students will spend two terms in the laboratory of a faculty member and carry out a laboratory research project. Prerequisites: PHYSL 210 or PHYSL 212/214 and consent from the course coordinator.

PHYSL468 Undergraduate Research Thesis I Course Page

Description: Individual study, open to undergraduate students who have identified a supervisor in the Department of Physiology. Taken in conjunction with PHYSL 469, this 6-credit course is the first part of a 12-credit program in two terms resulting in an honours research thesis in physiology. Students will spend the Fall term in the laboratory of a supervisor and carry out a research project to be continued in the second term as PHYSL 469. Co-supervision with Professors from other Departments is possible, provided that a supervisor from the Department of Physiology is identified. Students will be evaluated on an oral presentation, a written research proposal and performance in the laboratory. Prerequisites: PHYSL 210 or PHYSL 212/214 and consent from the course coordinator.

PHYSL469 Undergraduate Research Thesis II Course Page

Description: Taken in conjunction with PHYSL 468, this 6-credit course is the second part of a 12-credit program in two terms resulting in an honours research thesis in Physiology. Upon satisfactory progress in first-term PHYSL 468, students will continue their research and produce an honours thesis on their project. Students will be evaluated on a final oral presentation, a written research Thesis and performance in the laboratory. Prerequisites: PHYSL 210 or PHYSL 212/214 and consent from the course coordinator.

PHYSL500 Reproductive Physiology Course Page

Description: The aim of this course is to describe (i) the causes of infertility, (ii) therapeutic approaches to restore or enhance fertility and (iii) contraceptive approaches to avoid pregnancy. Lectures are the same as PHYSL 400, but with additional assignments and evaluation appropriate to graduate studies. Credit cannot be obtained for both PHYSL 400 and 500. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210 and consent of Department.

PHYSL501 Topics in Cardiovascular Physiology Course Page

Description: The goal of PHYSL 501 is to develop critical appraisal and presentation skills in advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Through critical review of controversial topics in modern cardiovascular physiology, the participant will learn to appreciate that literature is a dynamic, changing and fallible source of information. Presentation skills are developed through both oral and written assignments and facility with the use of electronic library resources is encouraged. Course content varies from year to year. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210, 404 and consent of Department.

PHYSL502 Problems in Current Research Course Page

Description: Individual study. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once.

PHYSL503 Neuroendoimmunomodulation Course Page

Description: The physiological and pathophysiological interrelationships between the nervous, endocrine and immune systems. Prerequisites: consent of Department. Priority given to students registered in a graduate program. Note: this course is not open to students with credit in the corresponding PHYSL 400 level course.

PHYSL504 Cardiovascular Physiology Course Page

Description: General concepts in human cardiovascular physiology: properties of the myocardium, heart function, vascular biology, hemodynamics and control of cardiovascular system. Discussion of cardiovascular pathologies and relevant clinical situations. Prerequisites: consent of Department. Priority given to students registered in a graduate program. Note: this course is not open to students with credit in the corresponding PHYSL 400 level course.

PHYSL505 Sensory Physiology Course Page

Description: The sensory systems in human physiology. The topics covered will be vision, hearing, vestibular mechanisms, taste, smell and touch, including receptor mechanisms and central organization. Prerequisites: consent of Department. Priority given to students registered in a graduate program. Note: this course is not open to students with credit in the corresponding PHYSL 400 level course.

PHYSL506 Tutorial and Seminar Course Course Page

Description: Guided reading course. Credit for this course may be obtained more than once.

PHYSL507 Molecular and Cellular Physiology Course Page

Description: The molecular and cellular aspects of physiological processes. Main areas include the structure and functions of plasma membranes (emphasizing transport processes, their regulation and methods of study) and the mechanism of action of hormones (hormonereceptor interactions, receptor regulation and interactions of intracellular mediators). The physiological significance of these processes will be stressed throughout. Prerequisites: consent of the Department. Priority given to students registered in a graduate program. Note: this course is not open to students with credit in the corresponding PHYSL 400 level course.

PHYSL509 Homeostatic Physiology Course Page

Description: Advanced principles of regulatory mechanisms in human and mammalian physiology, with in depth analysis of interrelationships between different organ systems in the maintenance of homeostasis. Clinical and physiologic perspectives are highlighted in the demonstration of how organ systems interact in health and the disruption in homeostasis which occurs in disease. Contemporary topics in energy and cardiovascular homeostasis such as the physiological adaptations to pregnancy, exercise, obesity and diabetes will be explored using an integrative, systems physiology approach. Suitable as preparation for careers in medicine, biomedical research and health-related fields. Prerequisites: consent of the Department. Priority given to students registered in a graduate program. Note: this course is not open to students with credit in the corresponding PHYSL 400 level course.

PHYSL513 Fetal Physiology Course Page

Description: The course stresses experimental approaches to understanding fetal physiology as well as the development and function of the fetus from ovulation to birth and adaptation to independent life. This course also deals with maternal physiology during pregnancy, complications of pregnancy, and newborn health. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210 and consent of Department.

PHYSL544 Current Topics in Neuroscience Course Page

Description: A lecture course emphasizing contemporary aspects of developmental, cellular, systems and cognitive neurophysiology. Topics will include experience-dependent processes in the development of the nervous system, the molecular and cellular mechanisms for learning and memory, the electrophysiology of rhythmic activity in identified brain circuits, the microphysiology of transmitter secretion, and the representation and transformation of information in the nervous system. Students will be expected to demonstrate a thorough understanding of selected readings from current and classical literature. Suitable for honors students in Physiology, Pharmacology, Psychology and Neuroscience. Prerequisites: consent of Department. Priority given to students registered in a graduate program. Note: this course is not open to students with credit in the corresponding PHYSL 400 level course.

PHYSL545 Physiology of Transport Systems Course Page

Description: A consideration of transport mechanisms primarily from the physiological rather than biochemical viewpoint. Major models considered are the erythrocyte and a variety of epithelia from vertebrates. Designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: PHYSL 212 and 214, or 210, or ZOOL 241 and 242.

PHYSL600 Colloquia in Physiology Course Page

Description: This discussion course will provide an opportunity for Provisional PhD candidates in the Department of Physiology, prior to their candidacy examination, to research, present and critique publications in areas relevant to their research, but not their own research. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: consent of Department. Open to MSc students in the Department of Physiology.